Tuesday, September 11, 2012

Barry's Recruiting Tips #2 - Football Camps

Barry's Recruiting Tips #2 - Football Camps

Photo by: National Underclassmen Football Combine

Barry's Recruiting Tips #2 - Football Camps

Courtesy: Barry Every / National Underclassmen Combine
          Release: September 10, 2012
Send this article to a friend Print RSS

Barry's Recruiting Tips #2 - Football Camps
In these times when money is tighter than ever choosing what football camps to go to can be a very daunting task. It seems almost every camp participant I have met has a dream of playing football after high school. There is no one that can guarantee that there is a scholarship for everyone to play football at the next level. But at the National Underclassmen Combine we hope to provide an opportunity for everyone to discover and improve their skill level. Below are some tips and answers to some of the most common questions regarding football camps.
 
1. What should I expect to get out of any football Camp? The thing that should be paramount at any camp is learning while improving your skills. Let's face it your number one goal should be to help your own high school football team win games.
2. Camps offer young budding football players a chance to compete against other kids with similar goals. Competition breeds mental toughness and is a great venue for improving your football skills.
3. How do I decide which camp(s) to attend during the spring and summer? Many factors should go into deciding which camp to attend. But the two biggest factors should be time and money. First of all you need to figure out the days you are available to attend camps. Then you must decide how much money to sit aside for camps.
4. Are some camps free? Yes there are free camps but most of them are invitation only and there is still money involved with travel. For example there may be a free camp in Houston, Texas but you live in the Dallas Metroplex. You have to ask yourself is it worth the time to drive all the way down there or should I wait and go to a camp closer to my home?
5. Is there a time I should not take part testing (40 yard dash, vertical jump) or even bother going to a camp? I recommend not going to any camp or combine if you are still overcoming an injury or are sick. No coach or recruiting analyst wants to hear the excuse that you didn't run a good time or perform to the best of your ability because you were injured.
6. Once I get a few scholarship offers should I stop going to camps? You should always be looking to improve football skills and compete against the best regardless if you have offers or not. Even if you're verbally committed to play football at the highest level you should still be looking to get better. Your football knowledge and skill set can't improve sitting on the couch playing video games.
7. Should I go to a college three day camps? If you have the income to afford the camp then go for it. But if you plan on hitting as many camps as possible I would highly recommend just going for the day. Most colleges have one day football camps for seniors and if they don't they can still prorate the cost of the camp for one day.
8. What advantage is there going to as many football camps as possible? Let's face it the more camps you attend the more chances you have of either impressing a college coach or a recruiting analyst. You also have the chance to receive training from several coaches. This means learning many techniques while finding out what style of coaching motivates best.
9. Should I only work out at one position at a camp? Some camps that may be all you really have time to do. But it is highly recommended that you work out on either side of the ball. Again this will increase your visibility to coaches and analyst. You may be surprised that that your best position at the next level is your secondary position versus your primary position in high school.
10. If you don't understand what a coach is trying to teach you on the practice field don't ever be afraid to ask questions. The last thing you want to do is go all out doing some technique the wrong way. These camps are for you so get the most out of each opportunity.
11. Proper nutrition and hydration are key elements to having a successful camp. This means making sure you have a good meal and start drinking non-carbonated fluids the day prior the camp. Too many participants wait till the morning of the camp to start hydrating. By then it is too late for your body to process all the fluids. Also make sure to have a nutritious breakfast and continue hydrating throughout the day of the camp.
12. Do not take stretching or warming up lightly. So many camp participants get hurt early in either during the testing phase or agility stations. This translates into a lost day at a football camp.
13. When a camp instructor is speaking remember to be polite by keeping your mouth shut. You are there to learn and if you are not listening then you are not learning. Plus you may be affecting other campers around you. Any time a coach takes the time to repeat instructions to campers that did not pay attention is time taken away from the overall camp.
14. It is highly recommended that you bring teammates to camps. Don't go alone when you can increase your football knowledge together with teammates. This helps build team chemistry while keeping you in shape during the off season. There is not a greater feeling than going into two-a-days knowing that you're already in football shape because of the camp circuit you took part in over the spring and summer.
15. Lastly some techniques may be taught differently at a camp versus your own high school. Don't make excuses just do what the camp instructors are teaching you. When you get back to your school then do exactly what your high school coach is teaching you. There is always more than one way to skin a cat. Versatility is the key to success in the game of football.

Post a Comment